Black Lives Matter

"“A riot is the language of the unheard,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said in his 1967 speech, The Other America. “And what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity.”

 

The Woolman community unequivocally stands in solidarity with Black Lives Matter protesters around the country and the world. Solidarity, however, is not just a statement. To truly stand in solidarity with Black folx, we are called to educate, to speak up, and to take action - as Friends have done for abolitionist causes throughout history. 

Below we have provided resources and guidance on how to use our privilege as a predominantly white community to start conversations and to support the Black Lives Matter movement.

Educate yourself!

As a starting point to research and unlearn racist narratives, we recommend this scaffolded list of anti-racism resources. This document also recommends a range of media options to explore and to recognize both privilege and implicit bias

Speak Up!

In addition to standing up to racism when you witness it, amplify and lift up Black voices in conversations about race and racism. Specific resources for white parents for raising anti-racist kids include these children’s books to support conversations about race and resistance and this NPR podcast episode on talking about race with young children.

Take Action!

While taking to the streets may not be feasible for vulnerable community members during the COVID-19 pandemic, action never stops at the front line. Organizers have compiled a comprehensive list of resources for accountability and actions for Black lives, including specific legislators to contact, organizations to support, and on-going campaigns to support.

Give Financial Support!

Consider donating to funds and organizations that are currently supporting protesters (from bail, to media coverage, to health care), as well as supporting Black-owned businesses.

Suggested donations list:

Own your mistakes and learn from them!

Living in a society built on systemic racism means that any anti-racist work will include unlearning racist behaviors and becoming aware of our own unconscious biases. We will all make mistakes in this process; it is what we do with those mistakes that matters.

“Privilege is not in and of itself bad; what matters is what we do with privilege,” writes bell hooks. “We have to share our resources and take direction about how to use our privilege in ways that empower those who lack it.”